Forum Spotlight: AAA Game Flops, Upgrade Your Old Notebook

by Reads (532)

Welcome to the NotebookReview Forum Spotlight, a biweekly series where we highlight the hottest and most important topics in our forum. The NotebookReview forum is the largest Internet forum dedicated to the discussion of notebook computers, including Macs and tablets. You can sign up for free by clicking here.

Triple-A Game Failures of 2018

Despite the money and marketing that preceded some of 2018’s biggest AAA-level game launches, some of them apparently didn’t make their sales numbers. Among them include Shadow of the Tomb Raider and Hitman 2. Fallout 76 is another, which deserves special mention because of its broken-on-release status that required a massive 54GB patch, larger than the game itself.Fallout 76

Just about all those games can be found discounted on Steam and other outlets. Battlefield 5 is yet another recent release that’s been getting the discount treatment.

Did you buy any of these games at full price and were disappointed? Share your input here. (I’m guilty as charged, having paid nearly $100 for the goodie-laden of Shadow of the Tomb Raider Croft Edition.)

Synaptics Touchpad Settings Disappear after Windows 10 Updates

If you’re a touchpad junkie, chances are you like your settings the way they are. Restoring Synaptics touchpad settings

If you were unfortunate enough to have your Synaptics-brand touchpad settings disappear after recent Windows 10 updates, you’re in luck. One of our forum members wrote a guide to getting them back. Get started!

Upgrading Old Notebooks Worthwhile?

One of the most frequently-asked questions in our forum is how to upgrade an older notebook. Take the Dell Inspiron 1520 as an example, released over a decade ago in 2007. The upgrade thread for that notebook has been active since 2011 and now spans 44 pages. There were some recent replies as I was typing this. I also replied to a  member earlier today who was looking to upgrade a HP EliteBook 8740w workstation, which has a several hundred page thread that’s been going since the notebook hit the market in 2010.Dell Inspiron 1520

What’s the consensus on upgrading older notebooks? There’s no one magic answer, but here are points to consider:

  • If the computer is already showing signs of obsolescence, such as not fully supporting the latest operating systems from Microsoft and Apple, it’s time to buy a new computer.
  • Older technology can be a lot more expensive than newer technology, making upgrades more expensive than you think. For example, if your computer uses an older memory standard such as DDR3, you’ll be fighting a fixed supply, as that type of memory has long been out of production. Furthermore, any investment you make in older technology like that won’t carry over into a newer computer you’d buy later; it would be a sunk cost.
  • Your old computer is going to be out of warranty. If it fails, you’ll be out of luck. It would probably make more sense to invest in a new computer to get the peace of mind that comes with a warranty.

If you have an older machine and are interested in upgrades, though, drop by the forums and ask. At least that won’t cost you anything!

Dealing with an Overheating CPU

Heat is the number one enemy for a computer’s performance. Notebook computers are one of the most challenging thermal environments out there because of space constraints. You can use software monitoring tools such as HWMonitor while running a benchmark like wPrime to determine if your notebook’s CPU is reaching a critical temperature and causing it to throttle its performance. Anything close to or north of 90 degrees C is borderline unsafe and will likely cause the CPU to throttle.

You have a few options if your CPU is overheating, such as applying new thermal paste and checking the fit of the heatsink. Look at the advice one member is getting here.

 

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